Fedora Core 8 Codname: Werewolf

Release Date is supposed to be tomorrow, I can’t wait.

http://fedoraproject.org/

Anyone else going to d/l it on release?

I’ve never really messed with Linux. I should really give it a look.

[QUOTE=49or bust;266723]I’ve never really messed with Linux. I should really give it a look.[/QUOTE]

Linux is great, only thing it lacks is Direct X which pretty much kills gaming. The best way to experiment with it is run it inside a VM (Virtual Machine). That way you can just close out of it when you want to…

The best way to experiment with it is run it inside a VM (Virtual Machine). That way you can just close out of it when you want to...

Yeah, I did that once before so that I could run Linux inside Windows XP. But since Linux supports 64 bits (like my 'puter) and Windows only 32 bits - I had it backwards. It’d be better to have Windows run inside Linux. I did like the idea of just downloading whatever application I wanted for free and some stuff seemed pretty powerful.

The problem I had with Fedora Core (I think 5) was that it had difficulty recognizing my hardware (specifically my infamous broadcom wifi). So I was recommended to switch to Ubuntu and I liked that much better - it’s made for ease-of-use (for idiots like me). I’ll probably go with the Kubuntu version - since it says that it recognizes my broadcomm. I plan on setting that all up soon. [URL=http://kubuntu.org/announcements/7.10-release.php]link[/URL]

Bust - I’d recommend the Kubuntu version for you, too, rather than Fedora Core 8 at first:

Desktop CD: includes a live system which allows you to try Kubuntu without changing your computer at all, and provides you with the option to install it permanently. This is the most common type of CD image that is downloaded, as the installation process is easier for new users. You will need at least 384MB of memory to install from this CD and 3GB of available hard drive space.

Basically, you can download it, burn it to a CD, and then plop it in so you can monkey around with it. You won’t risk f**king up your machine or have to deal with installing a Virtual Machine. If you like it, install it for real. It actually is kind of cool.

[QUOTE=survivor45;266730]Yeah, I did that once before so that I could run Linux inside Windows XP. But since Linux supports 64 bits (like my 'puter) and Windows only 32 bits - I had it backwards. It’d be better to have Windows run inside Linux. I did like the idea of just downloading whatever application I wanted for free and some stuff seemed pretty powerful.

The problem I had with Fedora Core (I think 5) was that it had difficulty recognizing my hardware (specifically my infamous broadcom wifi). So I was recommended to switch to Ubuntu and I liked that much better - it’s made for ease-of-use (for idiots like me). I’ll probably go with the Kubuntu version - since it says that it recognizes my broadcomm. I plan on setting that all up soon. [URL=http://kubuntu.org/announcements/7.10-release.php]link[/URL]

Bust - I’d recommend the Kubuntu version for you, too, rather than Fedora Core 8 at first:

Basically, you can download it, burn it to a CD, and then plop it in so you can monkey around with it. You won’t risk f**king up your machine or have to deal with installing a Virtual Machine. If you like it, install it for real. It actually is kind of cool.[/QUOTE]

Red Hat (Fedora is Red Hat’s Free Version) is the 800lb gorilla of Linux. I love Ubuntu as well, and Knoppix is absolutely a must for anyone.

BTW, the Live CD you talked about is great (I Think Knoppix was one of the first to introduce it.) I use the Live CD with Knoppix because you can easily boot up and bypass any Windows login, security, or other problems to get something off your or another HD. It’s useful when Windows pretty much craps and you have files you want to get.

[QUOTE=survivor45;266730]Yeah, I did that once before so that I could run Linux inside Windows XP. But since Linux supports 64 bits (like my 'puter) and Windows only 32 bits - I had it backwards. It’d be better to have Windows run inside Linux. I did like the idea of just downloading whatever application I wanted for free and some stuff seemed pretty powerful.

The problem I had with Fedora Core (I think 5) was that it had difficulty recognizing my hardware (specifically my infamous broadcom wifi). So I was recommended to switch to Ubuntu and I liked that much better - it’s made for ease-of-use (for idiots like me). I’ll probably go with the Kubuntu version - since it says that it recognizes my broadcomm. I plan on setting that all up soon. [URL=http://kubuntu.org/announcements/7.10-release.php]link[/URL]

Bust - I’d recommend the Kubuntu version for you, too, rather than Fedora Core 8 at first:

Basically, you can download it, burn it to a CD, and then plop it in so you can monkey around with it. You won’t risk f**king up your machine or have to deal with installing a Virtual Machine. If you like it, install it for real. It actually is kind of cool.[/QUOTE]

You could have downloaded the 32 bit version. You shouldn’t have had any problems then.

You could have downloaded the 32 bit version. You shouldn't have had any problems then.

:lol: The whole reason I experimented with the operating system was for the 64 bit compatibility!

[QUOTE=survivor45;266740]:lol: The whole reason I experimented with the operating system was for the 64 bit compatibility![/QUOTE]

Lol, I would have setup a dual boot then

Lol, I would have setup a dual boot then

never could figure that out.

If you like ubuntu, give linux mint a try. It’s a fork that adds a lot of media compatibility among other things.

Ubuntu/linux mint are both children of the Debian world in a sense which is where I like to play. Never been much of a fan of Redhat except for maybe as a server…

[QUOTE=ninermac;266862]If you like ubuntu, give linux mint a try. It’s a fork that adds a lot of media compatibility among other things.

Ubuntu/linux mint are both children of the Debian world in a sense which is where I like to play. Never been much of a fan of Redhat except for maybe as a server…[/QUOTE]

Linux mint, looks like another Linux distro I’m going to have to d/l :biggrin:.

BTW, ninermac did you ever tryout SUSE linux devloped by Novell? I tried it on another computer for a little, didn’t get much use with it, but I never installed or used it on any of my machines. I might give it a look, although it is supposed to be more for enterprise use I think.

Linux mint, looks like another Linux distro I'm going to have to d/l :biggrin:.

BTW, ninermac did you ever tryout SUSE linux devloped by Novell? I tried it on another computer for a little, didn’t get much use with it, but I never installed or used it on any of my machines. I might give it a look, although it is supposed to be more for enterprise use I think.

Played with Suse way back. It was one of the first ones out with a nice install. I didn’t keep it around long. It just didn’t seem that nice. Haven’t give it another try since.

Linux has came a long way… If you load up Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Mint, etc. and throw open office, and some graphical candy in Beryl (http://www.beryl-project.org/) on it. A lot of non-techies would be asking if it was the new windows or mac OS… If you haven’t tried Beryl, it adds very cool animations to the desktop…

I run Ubuntu on my laptop and will be switching to Mint here shortly I believe as well.

What does mint add to *buntu? I’ve seen themes for it and what not but never realized it was an actual release/distro. I should look it up.
I’ve almost switched over to Ubuntu Gutsy (7.10) and am loving it so far. 3D desktop ftw.

As usual, suck a$$ mirrors and everyone and their brother getting it on release. D/L speeds were slow at release and my DVD iso d/l errored about 4 times. I might give it a little while and try again, but it’s like this at release every damn time.