Football Misconceptions

All these lies and half-truths that have been circulating amongst the anti-football crown have been driving me crazy. We’ve worked too hard to let a handful of schmucks dampen our message with cheap shots.

I think it’s prudent that we make a Charlotte Football FAQ / Misconceptions list that could be easily be copied & posted elsewhere online in response to negative points made about football. It needs to be comprehensive (think about everything people have said against football [I]and why they’re wrong[/I]) and accurate (double check your numbers, folks).

Below I’ve included the beginnings of what I was able to scratch down after work yesterday, but there’s a lot more that can be said. Please post any anti-football arguments you’ve heard, and I’ll update the master list here.


  • [B]Football at UNC Charlotte will increase my North Carolina taxes.[/B]
    - WRONG. Funding will NOT come from a tax increase on the general population. That is illegal in the state of NC. Funding will come from a mixture of increased student fees, corporate sponsorships, donations, and sales.

  • [B]Football at UNC Charlotte will put undue strain on the students by the raising of student fees.[/B]
    - WRONG. The students have already officially voted on this issue in a Student Government vote in 2007. Support for football was the overwhelming majority. Over half the voters agreed that a $200 increase to student fees was a burden they would be willing and able to take on.

  • [B]With the economy on the downslide, UNC Charlotte should not undertake this task right now. It would be better for the football issue to be explored at a later date.[/B]
    - WRONG. UNC Charlotte has canceled plans to investigate football numerous times before due to less-than-perfect circumstances. There will never be a perfect time to start football. The sooner football gets started, the more likely Charlotte ends up in preferable conference when the next realignments happen.

(reserved)

Well, in all fairness, that second one is a little disingenous. Just because a majority of students (who participated in the vote) said they don’t mind the fee doesn’t mean that many students don’t disagree. It will, in fact, place a burden on many students. The important thing is whether or not the pros outweigh the cons.

Frequently asked questions about football
[list type=decimal]
[][B]What is the history of UNC Pembroke football?[/B] There was a football team at UNCP after World War II that ceased competition after the 1951 season. Several members of the UNCP Athletic Hall of Fame played football, including Ned Sampson, Delton Ray Locklear, Thomas Oxendine, Theodore Locklear, Les Locklear, Marvin Lowry, Joseph Sampson and Molon Strickland. The team was very competitive against junior college and club teams.
[
][B]Are UNCP students in favor of adding football?[/B] A survey was administered to more than 1,000 UNCP students in September 2004. Ninety-two percent voted “yes” to establish a football team.
[][B]Are there other colleges that have added football recently?[/B] In the last two years, four North Carolina and South Carolina universities started football programs. Coastal Carolina University, Shaw University and St. Augustine’s College added football in 2003 and North Carolina Wesleyan College added football in 2004.
[
][B]How was the decision made to study football at UNCP?[/B] A study was initiated by the UNCP Board of Trustees at the request of Chancellor Allen C. Meadors and the Athletic Department. In July, the trustees voted to conduct a football feasibility study.
[][B]Who will conduct the study?[/B] The University will utilize the services of consultant George “Buddy” Sasser. He is a former college football coach, conference commissioner and, most recently, the director of athletics at Coastal Carolina University before retiring in 1999.
[
][B]When will the feasibility study be completed?[/B] The goal is to have the study completed and submitted to the UNCP Board of Trustees at their meeting on December 3, 2004.
[][B]Will a football program cause UNCP to violate any Title IX gender equity rules?[/B] The consultant’s study will review all aspects of Title IX compliance and make recommendations if needed. UNCP will take action steps and formulate a gender equity plan if needed.
[
][B]Why would UNCP add football?[/B] The lesson, learned from other colleges and universities, is that football would give UNC Pembroke an opportunity to build stronger relationships between the community and the University, improve student retention rates, increase enrollment and improve school spirit and pride.
[][B]How do UNCP athletic programs compare to the other 14 UNC campuses with athletic programs?[/B] Ten campuses of the UNC system compete in the NCAA’s Division I. The remainder are Division II programs that play football. All UNC campuses that compete in the NCAA’s Division II - except UNCP - have football programs. UNCP is the only UNC campus that is neither a NCAA Division I university, or does not play football.
[
][B]Would UNCP be forced to change conferences if it added football?[/B] UNCP is currently a member of the Peach Belt Conference (PBC). All members of the conference are located in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina except UNCP. None of the 12 members in the PBC play football. Because the PBC does not sponsor football, UNCP may choose to remain a member of the PBC and participate independently in NCAA Division II football competition. UNCP currently sponsors two sports, wrestling and track that are not PBC-sponsored sports. UNCP may also examine joining another conference. The consultant’s feasibility study will examine conference affiliations. There are four Division II conferences in this region that play football. They are the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA), the South Atlantic Conference (SAC), Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC), and the Gulf South Conference (GSC).
[][B]How would UNCP fund the proposed football program?[/B] Football would be funded by private and corporate gifts, student athletic fees, Braves Club support and ticket sales.
[
][B]What are student athletic fees currently?[/B] Full-time UNCP students pay $187.50 per semester for athletics. Students taking less than 12 hours pay a pro-rated fee.
[][B]How do UNCP’s athletic fees compare with other UNC universities?[/B] UNC Asheville at $241.50 a semester and Western Carolina University at $214 per semester have the highest student athletic fees among UNC universities.
[
][B]When would the student athletic fees increase for football?[/B] If UNCP decides to add football, the new athletic fee would be in place at least two years prior to the team playing its first game.
[][B]What about students who pay the fee but graduate before the first football game is played?[/B] Any student who graduates from UNCP prior to the first football season would be given 10 free tickets for each semester they pay the new fee. These transferable tickets will be valid for 10 years. It is anticipated that general admission would be at least $10.
[
][B]Will UNCP reduce funding for other sports if football is added?[/B] No. Football would be funded only from the increased amount of athletic fees. The amount of the current fee will continue to support UNCP’s existing sports programs.
[][B]Where would the team practice, dress and play home games?[/B] The consultant’s feasibility study will examine these questions along with the costs of new facilities. The study will also investigate the possibility of playing games at existing facilities in the community and the possibility of using existing resources on campus.
[
][B]Who would the football team play against?[/B] If the football team does not join a conference, it would be classified as an NCAA Division II independent. An independent team would schedule as many games as possible with teams in our region. These teams might include Davidson College, members of the CIAA, such as Fayetteville State University, North Carolina Central University and Winston Salem State University; or SAC members, such as Wingate University, Catawba College, Lenoir-Rhyne College and Mars Hill College. If the UNCP football team joins a conference, it would play seven or eight conference games and two or three non-conference games.
[][B]Will adding football raise tuition costs?[/B] No. Athletics are not funded by tuition charges.
[
][B]If UNCP added football, would there be cheerleaders, marching band, dance team and color guard? [/B]Yes. UNCP already has a dance team, an award-winning Cheer Squad, a Marching Band, under the direction of Tracy Wiggins, and a Color Guard, under the direction of Linda Thomason.
[*][B]What lessons have other schools learned after the addition of football?[/B] Every school that has added football in the last 10 years has seen an increase in their retention rates, and UNCP is seeking to improve retention. A number of schools, including Coastal Carolina, have also experienced a dramatic increase in enrollment.[/LIST]

[QUOTE=Sideshow;324302]Well, in all fairness, that second one is a little disingenous. Just because a majority of students (who participated in the vote) said they don’t mind the fee doesn’t mean that many students don’t disagree. It will, in fact, place a burden on many students. The important thing is whether or not the pros outweigh the cons.[/QUOTE]

The anti- students had ample opportunity to vote and have their voice heard. To me, that means they accept the decision regardless of its result. Voting is not just a right, it’s also a burden one must undertake as an adult.

[QUOTE=Roasty;324304]The anti- students had ample opportunity to vote and have their voice heard. To me, that means they accept the decision regardless of its result. Voting is not just a right, it’s also a burden one must undertake as an adult.[/QUOTE]

the vote-or-die sentiment is well and good, but it doesn’t change the fact that many students will be burdened by the cost. It’s not as simple as you paint it. That’s all I’m saying. Just because someone doesn’t vote doesn’t mean they won’t be burdened by the increase.

Maybe they’ll be burdened, but if they didn’t vote, then their opinion doesn’t matter.

[QUOTE=Sideshow;324308]the vote-or-die sentiment is well and good, but it doesn’t change the fact that many students will be burdened by the cost. It’s not as simple as you paint it. That’s all I’m saying. Just because someone doesn’t vote doesn’t mean they won’t be burdened by the increase.[/QUOTE]

I can accept that, and am willing to reword anything. But it’s important to keep in mind that this is positive propaganda. I will not lie about anything, but I’m not going to give merit to the anti- sides arguments, either.

Do you have a suggestion on how to reword it? This is what this thread is for.

the vote-or-die sentiment is well and good, but it doesn't change the fact that many students will be burdened by the cost. It's not as simple as you paint it. That's all I'm saying. Just because someone doesn't vote doesn't mean they won't be burdened by the increase.

Also, as has been said MANY times before, it would still cost less to attend Charlotte (even with a $300 increase in fees) than the vast majority of UNC System schools! Therefore, this idea of burdening the students to much does not hold water IMO.

Roasty, you have to include the “total costs argument”!

[QUOTE=919R;324316]Also, as has been said MANY times before, it would still cost less to attend Charlotte (even with a $300 increase in fees) than the vast majority of UNC System schools! Therefore, this idea of burdening the students to much does not hold water IMO.

Roasty, you have to include the “total costs argument”![/QUOTE]

there you go. that’s a much better way to word it, I think.

current students are paying for the student union through student fees who weren’t even enrolled when the vote took place. It’s a rather moot point.

current students are paying for the student union through student fees who weren’t even enrolled when the vote took place. It’s a rather moot point.

current students are paying for the student union through student fees who weren't even enrolled when the vote took place. It's a rather moot point.

When did this vote take place? I didn’t know there was a vote. I knew I was paying for it but didn’t know the students voted for it before I got here.

my 2 big pet peeves that idiot talk show hosts use:

[B]we don’t fill up Halton[/B] (which is BS, we are 77 out of 344). And if we had football, we would be in a better conference to draw more hoop fans!!!

and this one drives me nuts: [B]there aren’t enough rabid UNCC fans[/B], they all pull for other schools…Well how do you fix that?? - FOOTBALL/better conference

both of these strawmen arguments make me livid. A full fledged athletic program in a big time conference is how you create a dynamic energetic fanbase. You gotta build the egg for a chicken to hatch.

  • Charlotte can’t fill Halton Arena for basketball games, so it cannot support a football team.

There are many schools that draw much less for basketball that support a football team. Just 2 examples nearby App St and ECU.

Bball Average attendance 2008

Charlotte 7,309
Appalachian St. 2,445
East Carolina 4,706

  • [B]Football at UNC Charlotte will contribute to Global Warming.[/B]

  • WRONG. The Charlotte 49ers are a GREEN team, and greenhouse gasses will be cut globaly by 97 percent once a football team at UNC Charlotte is established.

  • [B]Football at UNC Charlotte will get my teenage daughter pregnant.[/B]

  • WRONG. Charlotte 49ers football will probably hit on your daughter, and may even holler at your wife as well, but football at UNC Charlotte is focused on bigtime bowlgames, not your skeez daughter.

  • [B]Football at UNC Charlotte causes liver disease, rhumetoid arthrtis, diabeties, and chronic asthma.[/B]

  • WRONG. UNC Charlotte football cures all ailments and diseases, including cancer.

FOOTBALL AT UNC CHARLOTTE CAUSES TERRORISM:
Wrong. In fact, if the 49ers get football, Bin Laden will give himself, & convert to peace.

[quote=Chisox17;324341]- [B]Football at UNC Charlotte will contribute to Global Warming.[/B]

  • [B]Football at UNC Charlotte will get my teenage daughter pregnant.[/B]
  • WRONG. [I][B][U]Charlotte 49ers football will probably hit on your daughter, and may even holler at your wife as well, but football at UNC Charlotte is focused on bigtime bowlgames, not your skeez daughter.[/U][/B][/I]
    [I][/I]

nice…:lmao:

[QUOTE=Roasty;324304]The anti- students had ample opportunity to vote and have their voice heard. To me, that means they accept the decision regardless of its result. Voting is not just a right, it’s also a burden one must undertake as an adult.[/QUOTE]

In fairness, if the sentiment is people aren’t going to send checks until football is approved (often stated here), then there should be another vote if and when Dubois approves the funding structure that gives students another chance to vote, especially if you’re talking about a I-AA program for the long term. If the support is as overwhelming as you say, there’s no harm in a vote once Yes means certain football and the fee increase.

In fairness, if the sentiment is people aren't going to send checks until football is approved (often stated here), then there should be another vote if and when Dubois approves the funding structure that gives students another chance to vote, especially if you're talking about a I-AA program for the long term. If the support is as overwhelming as you say, there's no harm in a vote once Yes means certain football and the fee increase.

If we were offering this vote to the same body then I’d have no problem, but you would essentially be offering a vote to those years after. I paid for the student union and I’ll never use it, sorry, the truth hurts. I understand they’ll be the ones forced to pay it, but I never had a second say on anything, I had to pay, sure it wasn’t a total of that much, but I had to pay for multiple things I didn’t care about or use, but b/c it passed a vote. You don’t get a second chance to vote for a president or office. I love how we should have to pass a vote twice when anywhere else once is enough. The totals weren’t even close enough for a recount.