NCAA-NBA: 2 years before turning pro?

According to Jeff Goodman, the NCAA and NBA are looking to tweak the minimum age rule so that a player would have to play at least 2 seasons before leaving for the pro ranks…

FOXSports.com: Sources: NBA, NCAA hope to impose new age limit rule

According to Jeff Goodman, the NCAA and NBA are looking to tweak the minimum age rule so that a player would have to play at least 2 seasons before leaving for the pro ranks...

FOXSports.com: [B][URL=http://msn.foxsports.com/cbk/story/7996718/Sources:-NBA,-NCAA-hope-to-impose-new-age-limit-rule]Sources: NBA, NCAA hope to impose new age limit rule[/URL][/B]

Great for college basketball and the NBA, but terrible for the players. In all reality, it makes sense to go to the draft as soon as you can, because of injury and what not.

I think this is a terrible idea.

The 1 year benefits the NCAA as a whole and the NBA. College gets a player for 1 year who would never have been a student-athlete in the first place and helps promote the game. The NBA gets a known commodity (from a marketing point of view) entering the NBA draft instead of an unknown high school kid.

Making it two years is just asking for a lawsuit and ruining the whole damn thing.

I’m all for it. In fact, I say require players to have a degree to declare for the draft. If a Bachelors degree is too extreme, it could be as little as a 2-year Associates degree (you know, general ed requirements). I’m all for putting more emphasis on education in the NCAA.

As far as the NBA is concerned…not that I care much for the NBA…but I would think it would help the NBA in the long term in its goal of trying to get away from the negative, thug image. It’s been one of David Stern’s top priorities. Remember when they started requiring players to come to the arena in suits and Allen Iverson got his panties in a bunch? Yeah, that stuff. A professional image. I don’t know…perhaps such a move would help in that cause?

That being said, I haven’t heard the other side of the argument, so I’m willing to listen and change my mind…

Great for college basketball and the NBA, but terrible for the players. In all reality, it makes sense to go to the draft as soon as you can, because of injury and what not.
careful what you ask for... the longer kids stay in school, the more likely the BCS teams will take over college hoops again. "One and done" type players leaving early weaken the BCS teams (see Beasley, Durant, Oden) and give smaller programs a shot.

It’s good for the school because you have NO RIGHT to a scholarship if you give LESS than 2 years.
One year wonders are a waste to someone else’s chance at a scholarship.
P.S. If the Bobcats don’t want Niners to riot, then don’t draft traitor Beasley, who would have loved it here long enough to stay at least 2 years. No one wants to stay in Kansas 2 years.

[QUOTE=gotLutz;312833]I’m all for it. In fact, I say require players to have a degree to declare for the draft. It could be as little as a 2-year Associates degree (you know, general ed requirements). I’m all for putting more emphasis on education.

As far as the NBA is concerned…not that I care much for the NBA…but I would think it would help the NBA in the long term in its image, don’t you think?

That being said, I haven’t heard the other side of the argument, so I’m willing to listen and change my mind…[/QUOTE]

Ideally I would agree with this, require NBA players who are averaging millions to have a degree, just like almost any other high paying job. Honestly maybe this would help some with their accounting (does John Daly have a degree?). However the reality is that most of the star players in college who may have earned their degree, a large number of them obtained it for show only, do you really think the players at prominent schools aren’t getting a little unfair help or grading? On many campuses (Memphis) academics are an afterthought, you would be lucky if these guys show up for class. Not to say that their aren’t TONS of kids who are good students, but the stars, the university and the athlete understand their role. Athlete must play hard, bring recognition to the school and try to stay out of trouble, and probably bring the school millions. School will in return give the athlete exposure and training, the degree is an afterthought. About 41% of NBA players went to college for 4 years. However 57% of those arrested while in the NBA went to college for four years. Just goes to show many of them may have learned basketball in college but the didn’t learn how to improve themselves as a person, and if the NBA wants to improve their image, they are going to need an effective way to improve character (Duncan and Robinsons good guy camp)

Check out this for more info on players and college, it is 3 years old though.

http://sports-law.blogspot.com/2005/07/nba-players-that-get-in-trouble-with_20.html

[QUOTE=DownwithNBA;312842]Ideally I would agree with this, require NBA players who are averaging millions to have a degree, just like almost any other high paying job. Honestly maybe this would help some with their accounting (does John Daly have a degree?). However the reality is that most of the star players in college who may have earned their degree, a large number of them obtained it for show only, do you really think the players at prominent schools aren’t getting a little unfair help or grading? On many campuses (Memphis) academics are an afterthought, you would be lucky if these guys show up for class. Not to say that their aren’t TONS of kids who are good students, but the stars, the university and the athlete understand their role. Athlete must play hard, bring recognition to the school and try to stay out of trouble, and probably bring the school millions. School will in return give the athlete exposure and training, the degree is an afterthought. About 41% of NBA players went to college for 4 years. However 57% of those arrested while in the NBA went to college for four years. Just goes to show many of them may have learned basketball in college but the didn’t learn how to improve themselves as a person, and if the NBA wants to improve their image, they are going to need an effective way to improve character (Duncan and Robinsons good guy camp)

Check out this for more info on players and college, it is 3 years old though.

http://sports-law.blogspot.com/2005/07/nba-players-that-get-in-trouble-with_20.html[/QUOTE]

Wow could you be any more off-base? Bill Gates, Paul Allen and Steve Jobs don’t even have college degrees, should they have to forfeit their computer empires?

Kevin Garnett didn’t go to college and you couldn’t ask for a better representation of a pro-athlete, as is the same with Lebron James.

The NBA’s so called image problems are due to the fact that the majority of the players are black and they aren’t hidden behind a hemlet and uniform like the NFL. A four-year degree isn’t changing that. And trust me I’m not playing the race card, I’m totally against that, but with this so called image problem I am calling a spade a spade.

[B]I am not so sure that the one year rule benefits BOTH the NBA and the NCAA. This rule works out for the NBA because it gives teams a chance to get a better idea of what a player can do at a higher level. With players like Lebron, it was obvious that they were filled with NBA talent but other players lose some of the hype once they play a year in college. Also, the one and done players can essentially take an easy course load in the fall, then like Oden did last year, drop their spring classes once they announce. I do admit that from a fan’s point of view, I enjoy seeing players like Oden, Durant, Mayo, Rose, and Beasley play in the college game because of the excitement factor. I still say this rule hurts college athletics if you look at these players as “student athletes”. I am all for a 2 year rule. I think it would provide more stability for programs, and allow coaches time to replace these players. One impact player staying one year in college can help their team tremendously, but look at this year…only Derrick Rose is playing in the national championship, and he has a great cluster of players around him. [/B]

[B]I am not so sure that the one year rule benefits BOTH the NBA and the NCAA. This rule works out for the NBA because it gives teams a chance to get a better idea of what a player can do at a higher level. With players like Lebron, it was obvious that they were filled with NBA talent but other players lose some of the hype once they play a year in college. Also, the one and done players can essentially take an easy course load in the fall, then like Oden did last year, drop their spring classes once they announce. I do admit that from a fan’s point of view, I enjoy seeing players like Oden, Durant, Mayo, Rose, and Beasley play in the college game because of the excitement factor. I still say this rule hurts college athletics if you look at these players as “student athletes”. I am all for a 2 year rule. I think it would provide more stability for programs, and allow coaches time to replace these players. One impact player staying one year in college can help their team tremendously, but look at this year…only Derrick Rose is playing in the national championship, and he has a great cluster of players around him. [/B]

Wow could you be any more off-base? Bill Gates, Paul Allen and Steve Jobs don't even have college degrees, should they have to forfeit their computer empires?

Kevin Garnett didn’t go to college and you couldn’t ask for a better representation of a pro-athlete, as is the same with Lebron James.

The NBA’s so called image problems are due to the fact that the majority of the players are black and they aren’t hidden behind a hemlet and uniform like the NFL. A four-year degree isn’t changing that. And trust me I’m not playing the race card, I’m totally against that, but with this image problem I am calling a spade a spade.

You can’t compare comprehensive figures that take everyone into consideration with individual cases. Period. That’s kinda silly.

[QUOTE=gotLutz;312857]You can’t compare comprehensive figures that take everyone into consideration with individual cases. Period. That’s kinda silly.[/QUOTE]

If you want to play that game then having kids have to stay in college for 2 years is a AWFUL idea, since statistics show that NBA players who spend 2 years in college get arrested at a higher rate than kids that go to college for only 1 year…

Let’s not forget actors, musicians and other artisans that don’t have a degree.

If you want to play that game

Playing a game? What in the world are you talking about? It’s not about “playing a game,” it’s about making an argument, and using valid information to support your argument. DownwithNBA made an argument, and used statistics that covered everyone in the NBA. You called him “off base”, and then you counter his argument by pointing to two individuals. That’s how uneducated people argue. You may be right, but learn how to make an argument for heavens sake.

[QUOTE=Charlotte2002;312854]Wow could you be any more off-base? Bill Gates, Paul Allen and Steve Jobs don’t even have college degrees, should they have to forfeit their computer empires?

Kevin Garnett didn’t go to college and you couldn’t ask for a better representation of a pro-athlete, as is the same with Lebron James.

The NBA’s so called image problems are due to the fact that the majority of the players are black and they aren’t hidden behind a hemlet and uniform like the NFL. A four-year degree isn’t changing that. And trust me I’m not playing the race card, I’m totally against that, but with this so called image problem I am calling a spade a spade.[/QUOTE]

Wow did you read past the first two lines of my post? You know the part about an even greater number of NBA players with a four year degree being arrested, showing that a four year degree does not make you a mature or smart person. Before you comment please read the whole thing, don’t know what to make of the spade is a spade comment, I think it has to do with the fact that the NFL is overall a much better organization than the NBA.

bro- lay off the bold font

bro- lay off the bold font
this is why i love metro! count on him to make a post with no contribution to the argument at hand, just policing the font of the posts. this made me laugh...metro gets my votes for poster of the year.

only thing that needs to be said is that there are going to be a lot more academic problems now. teams are going to suffer the consequences of losing scholarships because of these one and done athletes.

Baseball has the best system to deal with amateurs.

a) You may be drafted out of high school, but if you do not like your draft position/contract offer at that time you can opt for a 4-year college or junior college. If you sign, you are sent to the minors.

b) You can be drafted at any time if you enter junior college (after 1st or 2nd year).

c) If you choose to enter a 4-year college, you cannot be drafted until after your [B]junior[/B] year or you are 21 years old.

Thus, if you plan to enter a 4-year college, you have to stay at least 3 years. I know this would make some of the BCS schools continuously strong, but at least we would know that when we landed a Rodney White-caliber player that we would have him for at least 3 years.

The NBA will never institute such a policy because their minor league system is a piece of crap with very little development taking place, and they can’t get the college players when THEY want them.

For fans of a college program, this system is much better than what the NBA or NFL has concerning draft eligibility. It does not hold back a prep phenom if he wants to go pro out of high school, and it does not hurt the college programs because there are no one-and-done players. They know when to expect to lose a great player.

Baseball has the best system to deal with amateurs.

a) You may be drafted out of high school, but if you do not like your draft position/contract offer at that time you can opt for a 4-year college or junior college. If you sign, you are sent to the minors.

b) You can be drafted at any time if you enter junior college (after 1st or 2nd year).

c) If you choose to enter a 4-year college, you cannot be drafted until after your [B]junior[/B] year or you are 21 years old.

Thus, if you plan to enter a 4-year college, you have to stay at least 3 years. I know this would make some of the BCS schools continuously strong, but at least we would know that when we landed a Rodney White-caliber player that we would have him for at least 3 years.

The NBA will never institute such a policy because their minor league system is a piece of crap with very little development taking place, and they can’t get the college players when THEY want them.

For fans of a college program, this system is much better than what the NBA or NFL has concerning draft eligibility. It does not hold back a prep phenom if he wants to go pro out of high school, and it does not hurt the college programs because there are no one-and-done players. They know when to expect to lose a great player.

If they would actually agree to this, as you said it would protect everyone’s interests the best. Baseball does have it right. Too bad they would never agree to such a rule.