OT: Duke football in trouble?

http://www.wral.com/sports/blogpost/1133506/

He said the discussion is expected to revolve around the delicate balance between maintaining the university's academic integrity and giving the football program enough academic flexibility to become competitive.
I always wondered about how hard academics were for athletes at places like Duke... I just find it interesting that their basketball team dominates usually. Is this to say basketball players are smarter than football players? Or have they already addressed this issue for basketball?

Don’t fix anything Dukies. The 49ers want some of you. :lol:

[QUOTE=ChevEE;210298]I always wondered about how hard academics were for athletes at places like Duke… I just find it interesting that their basketball team dominates usually. Is this to say basketball players are smarter than football players? Or have they already addressed this issue for basketball?[/QUOTE]

You need far fewer basketball players to be competitive. To find seven who meet your academic criteria (especially at a school with Duke’s basketball tradition) is much easier than finding 40-50 football players who do, just because of the numbers.

What is the average attendance at a Duke football game? Anyone know?

[QUOTE=Mike_Persinger;210308]You need far fewer basketball players to be competitive. To find seven who meet your academic criteria (especially at a school with Duke’s basketball tradition) is much easier than finding 40-50 football players who do, just because of the numbers.[/QUOTE]

You and me both know that if a top 10 recruit wants to go to Duke, but has the intelligence of a monkey, then they will be enrolled with no issues in the Fall. Duke basketball is able to get anyone in the door. You and I both know that it comes down to money in the end and Duke basketball is far in the black at the end of the year which ultimately helps the NCAA’s budget stray into the black as well.

What is the average attendance at a Duke football game? Anyone know?

It is actually pretty good. I’ve been to a game there, and it wasn’t even a decent opponent, and the place had a lot of people. I think if you want duke basketball season tickets you have to buy season football tickets.

19,580

[URL=http://web1.ncaa.org/d1mfb/Internet/attendance/IA_AVGATTENDANCE.pdf]http://web1.ncaa.org/d1mfb/Internet/attendance/IA_AVGATTENDANCE.pdf[/URL]

More than Dubois old school, which may be the only Dvision I school in the state. If that is what he is basing his opinion off of, then he needs to think about where he is at now.

[QUOTE=Ninerballin;210312]You and me both know that if a top 10 recruit wants to go to Duke, but has the intelligence of a monkey, then they will be enrolled with no issues in the Fall. Duke basketball is able to get anyone in the door. You and I both know that it comes down to money in the end and Duke basketball is far in the black at the end of the year which ultimately helps the NCAA’s budget stray into the black as well.[/QUOTE]

I haven’t ever interviewed a Duke basketball player, or heard one in a news conference, who I didn’t think was a smart kid. I can’t say that for most schools.

From GoDuke.com… their best gate last season was opening day against the 1AA Spiders.

Sep 02, 2006 RICHMOND 27546
Sep 30, 2006 VIRGINIA 19241
Oct 14, 2006 FLORIDA STATE 17525
Oct 21, 2006 MIAMI 16291
Oct 28, 2006 VANDERBILT 14198
Nov 04, 2006 NAVY 17782
Nov 25, 2006 NORTH CAROLINA 24478

[QUOTE=ninerID;210317]I think if you want duke basketball season tickets you have to buy season football tickets.[/QUOTE]
First you must join the Iron Dukes Club.

[QUOTE]Every Iron Dukes donor is mailed a season ticket application. Once all applications are returned to Duke Athletics, the Iron Dukes priority system is used to allocate available seats, starting from the top of the priority list and working down. Priority levels as of July 25, 2006 will be used. The projected Stadium Level for 2006-07 is Level 60 ($6,000/yr) for new donors and Level 55 ($5,000) for seat holders prior to the 2006-07 season. If the demand for season basketball tickets exceeds supply, Iron Dukes priority (amount of annual gift to the Iron Dukes, a record of cumulative athletics giving, plus years of continuous membership) will be used for new season ticket requests. This is an allocation; tickets are purchased separately.[/QUOTE]
Source: [URL=http://www.irondukes.net/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=5100&KEY=&ATCLID=214083][B]Iron Dukes, Duke Athletics Development[/B][/URL]
And to think we have folks that won’t pay $49 to join the 49er Club.

How many total students does Duke have?

[U][B]Duke Enrollment (full-time)[/B][/U]

[B]Fall, 2005 Total, 13,088[/B]

[B]Undergraduate, 6,244 [/B]
African-American, 11%
Asian-American, 14%
Hispanic/Latino, 7%
Caucasian, 56%
International, 5%
Other/Unknown, 7%

[B]Graduate and Professional, 6844[/B]
African-American, 6%
Asian-American, 8%
Hispanic/Latino, 3%
Caucasian, 56%
International, 21%
Other/Unknown, 6%

[QUOTE=ApexNiner;210330]From GoDuke.com… their best gate last season was opening day against the 1AA Spiders.[/QUOTE]
Opening night was “NASCAR Night” for the Blue Devils. Rednecks and Yankees united in Durham! :lmao:

[URL=http://www.goduke.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=22672&SPID=1843&DB_OEM_ID=4200&ATCLID=588065][B]Duke-Richmond Football Game To Feature NASCAR Theme [/B][/URL], GoDuke.com

I don’t know about you guys, but I fear that this is something else that Judy and the gang can use against Charlotte starting a football team. If Dook lowers it’s standards and allows football to get better, then they will say “football will hurt our academics;” If Dook gets rid of football, they can say, “See, Duke doesn’t have football because they are an intelligent, high academic standards school. That is the direction Charlotte should go.” I know that we should not be compared to Dook in academics, or sports for that matter (well maybe football, since we don’t have a team and um… all they really have are uniforms), but I can see Judy and the other nay-sayers stooping to that level. Anyone else get this feeling in your gut?

[QUOTE=ninerID;210317]It is actually pretty good. I’ve been to a game there, and it wasn’t even a decent opponent, and the place had a lot of people. I think if you want duke basketball season tickets you have to buy season football tickets.[/QUOTE]

yeah I have been to a few and had plenty of fun. I just did not know what the numbers were.

From GoDuke.com... their best gate last season was opening day against the 1AA Spiders.

Sep 02, 2006 RICHMOND 27546
Sep 30, 2006 VIRGINIA 19241
Oct 14, 2006 FLORIDA STATE 17525
Oct 21, 2006 MIAMI 16291
Oct 28, 2006 VANDERBILT 14198
Nov 04, 2006 NAVY 17782
Nov 25, 2006 NORTH CAROLINA 24478

but look where richmond and duke are…richmond draws a decent crowd to their games, and is not far at all from duke…plus richmond is a lot like a davidson in tradition and all, so im sure a lot of those 27000 were some spider fans

one of my friends that goes to duke says its a lot like ECU games…a lot more people tailgating before the game then people that actually end up in the game

[U][B]Duke Enrollment (full-time)[/B][/U]

[B]Fall, 2005 Total, 13,088[/B]

[B]Undergraduate, 6,244 [/B]
African-American, 11%
Asian-American, 14%
Hispanic/Latino, 7%
Caucasian, 56%
International, 5%
Other/Unknown, 7%

[B]Graduate and Professional, 6844[/B]
African-American, 6%
Asian-American, 8%
Hispanic/Latino, 3%
Caucasian, 56%
International, 21%
Other/Unknown, 6%

That’s larger than I thought… I figured around 6-7k.
Anyway, thanks, HP.

[QUOTE=Mike_Persinger;210329]I haven’t ever interviewed a Duke basketball player, or heard one in a news conference, who I didn’t think was a smart kid. I can’t say that for most schools.[/QUOTE]

WOW, you mean you actually thought Sean Dockery, Corey Magette (sp?), Shelden Williams and my favorite Casey Sanders :lmao: were smart? Reggie Love is another that comes to mind (although that might be due to the fact that he had no common sense.)

Here’s an article for you to read highlighting how Duke is have that 100% grad rate. While wrote back in 2002, it’s still relevant today. [URL=http://www.truthaboutduke.com/outside_lines.php]http://www.truthaboutduke.com/outside_lines.php[/URL]

Of course a lot of athletes do what is highlighted in that article, just Duke likes to put themselves as the standard.

Here’s another:

Another dated article highlighting some Duke Basketball mishaps academically-

[URL=http://www.slate.com/id/101920/]http://www.slate.com/id/101920/[/URL]

[QUOTE]
The Blue Devils Aren’t Angels
By Jason Zengerle
Posted Tuesday, March 6, 2001, at 3:00 AM ET

Shane BattierIt’s hard to dislike Shane Battier. On the court, the Duke senior is a whirling dervish—grabbing rebounds, chasing down loose balls, and draining three-point shots with alarming frequency for a 6-foot-8-inch power forward. Off the court, he’s a religion major with a 3.4 GPA. He serves as the chairman of the executive committee of the Student Basketball Council, a group that’s trying to give unpaid student-athletes a say in the multibillion-dollar business of college basketball. But even with this impressive résumé, there’s no way that Battier would be compared to former Princeton All-American and Rhodes Scholar Bill Bradley (as he recently was in a fawning New York Times profile) were it not for one key factor: He plays for Duke, the team constantly held up as the white knights of the increasingly sullied college basketball world.

Watch any Duke game on television and listen to the announcers praise the Blue Devils for their “intelligence” and their “class.” See Duke’s mascot greet players from opposing teams with the sarcastic sign, “Welcome Fellow Scholars.” Pick up a column by the pre-eminent basketball writer John Feinstein (Duke, Class of '77) and read him gush about “the school that wins with smart kids.” Battier is just the latest Duke player to be put in Bradley’s company. Before him came Danny Ferry, Christian Laettner, Grant Hill, and Trajan Langdon.
[b]
There’s only one problem with all this Dukophilia. It’s absolute bunk. Just consider some recent happenings at Duke:

In 1995, Duke center Greg Newton was suspended from the school for two semesters after a student court found him guilty of cheating on a computer science exam. Newton returned to Duke and resumed playing for the basketball team. Two years later, Duke guard Ricky Price was suspended from school for plagiarism. He too returned to Duke and resumed his basketball career.

In 1999, Duke point guard William Avery led the Blue Devils to the NCAA championship game. Unfortunately, while Avery was lighting it up on the basketball court, he wasn’t going to many classes—and as soon as the season was over, Avery, a sophomore, dropped out of school and made himself eligible for the NBA draft.

Last year it was discovered that another player from that 1999 team, Corey Magette (who also left the school early to go to the NBA), shouldn’t have been playing at all, because he was ineligible. While in high school, Magette had received $2,000 from a summer-league coach. Pending a decision by the NCAA, Duke may have to forfeit all its victories from that year.

Earlier this month, the San Jose Mercury News, examining data from 1994-97 (the last four-year period the NCAA used for documentation of grades and test scores), found that freshmen entering Duke on basketball scholarships during that period had an average SAT score of 968. The average SAT score for Duke’s freshman class as a whole is generally in the high 1300s.[/b]

If all this sounds rather ho-hum and familiar, that’s the point. Duke, for all the hoopla, isn’t immune to the various ills plaguing college athletics—from compromised academic standards in admissions to student-athletes misbehaving once they are admitted. Duke probably doesn’t cut as many corners as the Fresno States of the world, but it’s not a bastion of purity, either.

So what explains the general perception of Duke as being above the fray? Part of it can be attributed to Duke’s general academic reputation. (Although Stanford’s basketball team, currently ranked No. 1, seldom receives Duke-like accolades.) Another explanation is Duke’s vaunted PR machine. Whenever a Duke player does a summer internship on Wall Street or learns a second language, the media inevitably hear about it. (Georgetown players, on the other hand, have been working as summer interns on Capitol Hill for years, but you never hear about it in the press. The only reason I know is that I’ve seen some of them up there.) There’s also probably an unfortunate racial element to the perception. The fact that Duke always has a number of white players no doubt makes some basketball observers assume the team is smarter than the rest.

But the biggest reason for Dukophilia is that people are desperate to believe in it. With college sports such a cesspool, people want there to be one school that hasn’t compromised its academic mission in the pursuit of hardcourt glory. They want scholar-athletes like Bradley to still play the game. But as William G. Bowen and James L. Shulman document in their recent book The Game of Life, even the basketball players at Bradley’s alma mater aren’t what they used to be. While once upon a time athletes going to Ivy League schools had the same academic profile as non-athletes, today they have lower SAT scores and GPAs, on average, than their fellow, non-athletic students.

Every team in college basketball has cut corners. And, as fans, we benefit from those cut corners. The high level of play we’ve come to expect from the nation’s best college teams just wouldn’t be possible without some of those compromises. It’s a choice we as fans have made. Now we have to live with it. Duke is an outstanding basketball team. Let’s just appreciate that team for what it really is.[/QUOTE]