OT: Looks like a lottery for NC

Buried in an Observer story today…

N.C. to have lottery, thanks to budget deal
MARK JOHNSON, Raleigh Bureau, The Charlotte Observer
August 6, 2005

RALEIGH - North Carolina would start a lottery, advertise it and spend the profits on teachers, school buildings and scholarships for the needy under a final budget plan worked out by House and Senate negotiators Friday.

The compromise between House and Senate plans for a lottery virtually ensures that North Carolina will start a state numbers game during the next year. The lottery was the last disputed issue between the House and Senate in budget negotiations.

The lawmakers, said Senate Majority Leader Tony Rand, even included a special lottery rule: No ticket may feature the likeness of any current or former elected official.

Lawmakers likely will get a copy of the compromise budget by Monday evening, and House Speaker Jim Black promised members a day to digest the phonebook-size document. Under that schedule, the budget would be up for the first of two votes in each chamber on Wednesday. The $17 billion-plus spending plan is more than a month overdue.

“It’s something we think will be acceptable to a majority” of the legislature, said Rand, a Fayetteville Democrat who helped forge the lottery deal.

Under the lottery plan, no more than 1 percent of revenue can be spent on advertising, and the ads must avoid themes that appeal to children. The odds of winning must be clearly publicized. The odds of winning, for example, South Carolina’s “Hot Lotto” grand prize are 1 in 11 million, while the Powerball grand prize odds are 1 in 120 million.

Five percent of proceeds goes toward creating a $50 million reserve fund in case lottery revenues dip. Of the remaining money, 50 percent goes to reduce class sizes in elementary schools and fund the state’s pre-kindergarten program, 40 percent pays to build new schools and 10 percent bankrolls college scholarships for the poor.

The Senate will still have to take a separate vote after passing the budget to actually enact the lottery. It will take several months to appoint a lottery board, hire a director and staff and start operations.

“It’s not likely any tickets will be sold this calendar year,” Rand said.

The budget would increase the cigarette tax from a nickel a pack to 30 cents per pack on Sept. 1 and to 35 cents per pack next July 1. The boost means North Carolina will shed its status of imposing the lowest tax on smokes in the nation and will pass that title to South Carolina, which charges tax of 7 cents per pack.

Senate leaders argued for taking the tax to 40 cents per pack this year, but a group of tobacco country Democrats in the House tamped down that figure.

The tax on liquor, satellite TV, telephone service, cable TV and candy bars rises to 7 percent (7.5 percent in Mecklenburg) to help create a more uniform tax rate and join a state-to-state effort to tax Internet sales. Most of those goods and services are currently taxed at 5 percent or 6 percent.

State employees would get a 2 percent pay raise or $850, whichever is greater, plus an extra week’s vacation. Teachers would receive 2.24 percent, though Gov. Mike Easley would have the power, after consulting the legislature, to raise their salaries further. Democratic leaders said they are trying to address the state’s failure to keep up with the national average on teacher pay after working for several years to get there.

“We’ve slipped somewhat,” said Sen. Kay Hagan, a Greensboro Democrat and budget committee chair.

Other key components of the budget include:

UNC Chapel Hill and N.C. State University will not get authority to independently raise their tuition. A Senate proposal let them bypass the UNC system board of governors.
• Corporations and the state’s top income earners do not get a tax cut, as the Senate originally proposed.
UNC Charlotte gets $5 million this year and $10 million next year toward establishing a doctoral program. Johnson & Wales University gets another $1 million, for a total of $3 million, toward the $10 million they were promised for opening a campus in Charlotte.
• Kindergartners will be required to get an eye exam before starting school, and the state will provide $2 million for children not covered by insurance or government programs.

Could this state be any more backwards.

[i]Originally posted by 49erpi[/i]@Aug 6 2005, 06:34 PM [b] Could this state be any more backwards. [/b]
I ask myself that constantly. But in one week we get a lottery and the alcohol limit on beer gets raised from 6% to 15%, finally striking down a prohibition-era law that only five other states have. So now I don't have to go to S.C. to buy Powerball tickets and I don't have to go to Va. or Ga. for my high-end beer.

Driving to South Carolina for 1 in 120 million odds? Wow. Time on your hands?

[i]Originally posted by UNCCTF[/i]@Aug 6 2005, 11:10 PM [b] ..and the alcohol limit on beer gets raised from 6% to 15% [/b]
DOOOOOOOF!!! :toast: :drink:
[i]Originally posted by mineshaft[/i]@Aug 7 2005, 12:05 AM [b] Driving to South Carolina for 1 in 120 million odds? Wow. Time on your hands? [/b]
Well I only buy lottery tickets when I'm in S.C. for another reason. I never go exclusively to get those.
[i]Originally posted by Chisox17+Aug 7 2005, 03:16 AM-->
[b]QUOTE[/b] (Chisox17 @ Aug 7 2005, 03:16 AM)
<!--QuoteBegin-UNCCTF[/i]@Aug 6 2005, 11:10 PM [b] ..and the alcohol limit on beer gets raised from 6% to 15% [/b] DOOOOOOOF!!! :toast: :drink: [/b][/quote] I emailed Michael Easley about it and told him I supported it but his folks haven't replied. Maybe I am not "King of the Hill enough" for him.

The Christian Action League put up a huge fight against the bill because - this is no joke - they felt that high-abv malt liquors would be targeted more towards blacks and Hispanics, and lead to a rise in crime. One Senator, in opposing the measure, even said “Let’s not do this to our black brothers and sisters.” I’m not sure if that’s blatant racism or not, but it at least comes close. The beers that will come in to N.C. now are aged, expensive barleywines and imperial stouts that have 10+% alcohol and cost over $5 for a single bottle.

[i]Originally posted by UNCCTF+Aug 7 2005, 03:27 AM-->
[b]QUOTE[/b] (UNCCTF @ Aug 7 2005, 03:27 AM)
<!--QuoteBegin-mineshaft[/i]@Aug 7 2005, 12:05 AM [b] Driving to South Carolina for 1 in 120 million odds? Wow. Time on your hands? [/b] Well I only buy lottery tickets when I'm in S.C. for another reason. I never go exclusively to get those. [/b][/quote] I know of a few people who have driven to West Virginia specifically to buy Powerball tickets. I chastized them heavily. One of them was a Charlotte grad. :o

I have mixed feelings about the lottery. I would like for NC to keep the money being spent on other states’ lotteries, but there are proven statistics that the crime rate has increased in every state after a lottery was added. Not sure if what kind of crimes increased, but it’s not a good sign.

[i]Originally posted by UNCCTF[/i]@Aug 7 2005, 11:34 AM [b] The Christian Action League put up a huge fight against the bill because - this is no joke - they felt that high-abv malt liquors would be targeted more towards blacks and Hispanics, and lead to a rise in crime. One Senator, in opposing the measure, even said "Let's not do this to our black brothers and sisters." I'm not sure if that's blatant racism or not, but it at least comes close. The beers that will come in to N.C. now are aged, expensive barleywines and imperial stouts that have 10+% alcohol and cost over $5 for a single bottle. [/b]
wow. sadly, it really doesnt surprise me that the Christian Action League pulled that crap. blatant racism

X-49er, I’m with you. I play some of the small money games if I am in the area to get a ticket on occasion. But I’ve seen the lines for people trying to win a Powerball lottery just over the VA-NC line. The cars outside had NC tags, so that money needs to stay in the state. I wish there was some system for scholarships like in Georgia. My cousin has gone to Ga Tech with free tuition because of the lottery (and working to keep the grades up). And they had the money saved up for college, now he’ll have a nice nest egg to begin with after he finishes next year.

[i]Originally posted by HP49er[/i]@Aug 7 2005, 12:48 PM [b] My cousin has gone to Ga Tech with free tuition because of the lottery (and working to keep the grades up). [/b]
Why didn't he come to Charlotte, even if it wasn't free?
[b]QUOTE (HP49er @ Aug 7 2005, 12:48 PM) My cousin has gone to Ga Tech with free tuition because of the lottery (and working to keep the grades up).

Why didn’t he come to Charlotte, even if it wasn’t free? [/b]

Georgia Tech has football, for what other reason could there be? :ph34r:

[i]Originally posted by 49erpi[/i]@Aug 6 2005, 07:34 PM [b] Could this state be any more backwards. [/b]
We weren't called "the Rip Van Winkle state" for nothing. Always snoozing, usually as a result of some perceived transgression we might commit toward God. GET FRICKIN' REAL!!! As for me, the $ needs to stay in NC. All bordering states have lotteries and the flood of money to them has got to stop.
[i]Originally posted by 49RFootballNow[/i]@Aug 7 2005, 03:07 PM [b] Georgia Tech has football, for what other reason could there be? :ph34r: [/b]
CANNONBALL! Football was not the reason he attends Ga Tech, he attended a junior college his first year, which was paid for by the state.
  1. His father is an alum of Georgia Tech.
  2. He wished to work in computer technologies.
  3. He could’ve gone anywhere desired, the money was there in a nice college fund.
  4. Georgia has the Hope scholarship program, any Georgia student leaving high school with a B average and maintaining it, will have their tuition paid at any Georgia state college/university.

In fact, he has his own set of Falcons season tickets, goes to their games more than to see the Yellow Jackets. He does go to most basketball games though.

[i]Originally posted by HP49er[/i]@Aug 7 2005, 10:33 PM [b] 3) Georgia has the Hope scholarship program, any Georgia student leaving high school with a B average and maintaining it, will have their tuition paid at any Georgia state college/university.

[/b]

That is awesome!

VA, here is some info on the Hope program.

[b]In fact, he has his own set of Falcons season tickets, goes to their games more than to see the Yellow Jackets. He does go to most basketball games though. [/b]

He’s a Dirty Bird fan!, well he can have Ron Mexico and the d@#n Falcons! :stuck_out_tongue:

Anyone know what Doctoral program that 5 million was being set aside for?

Public universities with doctoral programs in NC get an extra $10 million a year (Read: UNC-CH and NCSU) in funding. Of course we don’t. ECU usually gets the shaft as well.