Charlotte at Indiana

This time Doyel chimes in.

Officiating controversies

I know we’ve been over it time and again, and have sufficiently flogged this dead horse but it is a media mention of the Niners, and I’m merely passing it along.

At least we’re mentioned first, although the game was the first to occur this season.

i say why in the hell is the jump ball call in the alabama game not in the list.

doesn’t the ruling depend on the red light on top of the basket or is that only for shot clock violations? I thought the red light always supersedes the timer.

Even though he had nothing to do with this, Pat Forde is an asshole.

[b]doesn't the ruling depend on the red light on top of the basket or is that only for shot clock violations? I thought the red light always supersedes the timer.[/b]

It should be the same, but I think they change that rule though.

Was I wearing green tinted glasses when I watched that play over and over, practically frame by frame on my computer and Plav did in fact catch, dribble, turn and shoot in 0.7 seconds? This TV-clock synch BS is a myth being perpetuated by IU and I’ll bet Doyel has never taken time to look closely at the play for himself.

The clock visible on the screen appeared to be synched to the play visible on the screen, started as fast as humanly possible after Plavich caught the ball and was clearly out of his hands before time expired. If the synch delay was anything more than a tenth of a second, they would have had to start the clock before he caught it, PERIOD!

This is total BS! How many tenths of a second ticked off the clock after the previous play before the timer reacted and hit the button. Put those tenths of a second back on the clock. And while you are at it, how about the dozens of other clock stops and starts during the game? How accurate were they? Unless the clock operator is Dr. Johhny Fever after drinking a fifth of Jack, I could probably find a few more seconds for Plav to drive to the basket for a layup if I took the time. I’m obviously being facetious but the point is, the clock operator, the refs, the guys in the tv truck are only human. You can’t overturn a game judging by the final tenth of a second when all evidence available to them at the time says they made the right call, unless you hold the other 23,999 tenths of a second during the game to the same standard.

We won, end of story, enough of this revisionist history BS. Plavich made a 50 ft jumper in 0.7 seconds and it was a fantastic ending to a college basketball game. Don’t cheapen it with this asterisk on our record.

very well put meinshaft.

in basketball the game ends when the horn sounds. the horn sounds at the expiration of time and the red light comes on. in the old days before the clocks started showing tenths of a second the clock could read 0:00 but horn may not have sounded meaning there was still some amount of time remaining. i don’t know if the game clocks are rounded to a tenth or not but the horn and the light should be the same and 0:00 does not necessarily mean all the time has expired.

[i]Originally posted by MeinShaft[/i]@Jan 25 2005, 01:44 PM [b] Was I wearing green tinted glasses when I watched that play over and over, practically frame by frame on my computer and Plav did in fact catch, dribble, turn and shoot in 0.7 seconds? This TV-clock synch BS is a myth being perpetuated by IU and I'll bet Doyel has never taken time to look closely at the play for himself.

The clock visible on the screen appeared to be synched to the play visible on the screen, started as fast as humanly possible after Plavich caught the ball and was clearly out of his hands before time expired. If the synch delay was anything more than a tenth of a second, they would have had to start the clock before he caught it, PERIOD!

This is total BS! How many tenths of a second ticked off the clock after the previous play before the timer reacted and hit the button. Put those tenths of a second back on the clock. And while you are at it, how about the dozens of other clock stops and starts during the game? How accurate were they? Unless the clock operator is Dr. Johhny Fever after drinking a fifth of Jack, I could probably find a few more seconds for Plav to drive to the basket for a layup if I took the time. I’m obviously being facetious but the point is, the clock operator, the refs, the guys in the tv truck are only human. You can’t overturn a game judging by the final tenth of a second when all evidence available to them at the time says they made the right call, unless you hold the other 23,999 tenths of a second during the game to the same standard.

We won, end of story, enough of this revisionist history BS. Plavich made a 50 ft jumper in 0.7 seconds and it was a fantastic ending to a college basketball game. Don’t cheapen it with this asterisk on our record. [/b]

[b]We won, end of story, enough of this revisionist history BS. Plavich made a 50 ft jumper in 0.7 seconds and it was a fantastic ending to a college basketball game. Don't cheapen it with this asterisk on our record.[/b]

Agreed.

You cannot isolate and scrutinize one stop/start of the clock without examining every stoppage throughout the game.

If you went back and scrutinized every time the clock was stopped there may have been 5 seconds on the clock when we inbounded, or you may find that IU didn’t have enough time to get their shot to fall. Human error is part of every sport and that is just the way it goes.

I think i’ll take my chances with Plav taking a 50 footer with .7 left…rather than driving the hoop! He’s money from 50 ft. and beyond!!!

The IU ‘no-time left’ nonsense pales to the Levitt ‘no-shot call’ of a few years back when the Niners beat UC at Halton when they were ranked #3. I’m still quite pissed that the then C-USA commish. Mike ‘Slime’ Slive publicaly came out and said the Niners should not have won the game.

[i]Originally posted by MeinShaft[/i]@Jan 25 2005, 02:44 PM [b] Was I wearing green tinted glasses... [/b]
probably not, but I was B)
[i]Originally posted by Green Tinted Glasses+Jan 25 2005, 04:52 PM-->
[b]QUOTE[/b] (Green Tinted Glasses @ Jan 25 2005, 04:52 PM)

I heard Jay Bilas talking about this during the Indiana game after ours (the Purdue game?) where, at the end of the game, a Purdue guy was fouled as he shot, and the shot was clearly released after the buzzer. The refs then screwed up and counted the basket to tie the game, and awarded the shooter a free throw with no time left to win the game. Lucky for Indiana (and our RPI), the guy missed the free throw, and Indiana won in overtime. After the game, Big Ten officials admitted that the shot should NOT have been counted, since it was released after the shot clock went to zero, and the guy should have been awarded 2 shots instead.

Bilas stated that the rule USED to be that the red light took precedence over the clock and the horn. He also said that THIS YEAR, the rule had been changed so that the CLOCK takes precedence, then the red light. Of course, he also went on to say that Indiana got jobbed in the Charlotte game without explaining why, frustrating the hell out of me!

What kind of delay could it have been anyway. The delay caused by video signals (you know, little electrons that travel at the speed of friggin’ light!) going to the truck and back would be measured in milliseconds (if any), not tenths of a second. They didn’t beam it to the moon and back. And why would there be a any delay in the clock image and not the other? Do you mean to tell these fans that the laws of physics exist everywhere in the world except in your video equipment?

Actually the electrons don’t travel the speed of light because they have mass, and therefore cannot reach the speed of light. Electrcity does though, and if they truck was say 100 meters away it’d reach the monitors in 300 nanoseconds. I’m sure I’m oversimplifying a bit, and some EE is going to get me on that, but, whatever.

Shot’s good. We win.

[i]Originally posted by NinerLoudNProud[/i]@Jan 26 2005, 10:37 AM [b] Shot's good. We win. [/b]
I understand that science.
[i]Originally posted by ziltz[/i]@Jan 25 2005, 11:40 PM [b] Bilas stated that the rule USED to be that the red light took precedence over the clock and the horn. He also said that [b]THIS YEAR, the rule had been changed so that the CLOCK takes precedence, then the red light[/b]. [/b]
I think they changed it in response to the Texas/Providence game last year, in which a Texas player hit a game winning shot, with the ball still in his hand at 0.0, yet the red light didn't come on until several tenths later. The refs gave Texas the win, despite the clear fact that he had the ball in his hand when time ran out. I almost threw TV out the window watching the end of that game, and seeing how Providence got robbed...

At the Indiana game, the announcer was claiming that the red light came on before the shot left his hand. In reality, the red light is just out of he camera’s view when BP lets go. The camera continues to pan and then you see the red light. There was no way to tell on the replay which happened first. Correct call, quit bitching IU fans. They played over their heads that night, just to keep it close. IU was shooting 30% as a team coming into that game.