New RPI is the Mid Major Enhanced Version

Ken Pom just added a column to his site that shows the RPI’s old version vs the new version and the difference in ranking. Most every team is within 3-4 spots of the old version (Charlotte is actually -1 under the new formula).

The funny part is, if you look only at the teams that have a +8 or higher difference using the new formula…THEY ARE ALL MID-MAJORS!!!

So. Illl +8
Vermont +19
Miami (OH) +22
Holy Cross +26
St Mary’s +14
Old Dominion +24
Akron +31

VERY interesting

Ken Pom RPI

We’re at 23.

See, that wasn’t so painful playing #101.

If you win and your opponent has been hammered by the likes of Syracuse, Maryland, Pitt and Texas and beats Louisville, you benefit from their opponents opponents winning percentage.

theoretically, the disparity of the mentioned “midmajor” programs’ rpi results is what you should be seeing with the new formula. Since it weights road victories, those teams who win on the road are most benefited. And who plays on the road the most during their non-conference schedule (since once you get into conference, road/home should be 50/50 for everyone)?? The so-called “mid-majors”.

[i]Originally posted by Anborn[/i]@Feb 24 2005, 12:52 PM [b] And who plays on the road the most during their non-conference schedule (since once you get into conference, road/home should be 50/50 for everyone)?? The so-called "mid-majors". [/b]
^^^ Yup. Good point.

Seems to me like the way to ace this new RPI is to win at home and win on the road. Doesn’t matter too much who you play, just as long as you’re not a complete bottom feeder. But it does help if your road losses are to high RPI/major conference teams.
S. Illinois is probably the best example of this (with Memphis being the exact opposite - tried to schedule everyone but lost a bunch at home).

I see your point, but win at home and win on the road. Honestly, how does that change anyone’s strategy from the old RPI. I’m pretty sure most teams have always tried to win every game. Just some smart-ass humor for the topic.

[i]Originally posted by The Ambassador of Qwan[/i]@Feb 24 2005, 02:15 PM [b] I see your point, but win at home and win on the road. Honestly, how does that change anyone's strategy from the old RPI. I'm pretty sure most teams have always tried to win every game. Just some smart-ass humor for the topic. [/b]
Doh, got me on that one. :wacko:

B) What I meant was more along Anborn’s point - mid major teams play a ton of games on the road, more so than a Syracuse or other team that likes to stay home as much as they can pre-conference. So they win those road games (even if it’s against another mid-major, or a cupcake) and they get extra points.
Then, when the majority of their home games come against cupcakes/easy conference opponents, they benefit as well.

Where as the old RPI, one might try to play some better teams pre-conference instead of just trying to play a beatable team on the road.
It’s getting to be pretty clear that this new formula is partial to mid-major teams (not that I have a huge problem with that) - obviously, my first post wasn’t so clear. :wacko: :smiley:

Looks like Memphis is out with whatever formula you use! Good riddance! :smirk:

No, you were clear enough for me, I’ve just heard this argument before and felt like being a smart ass, because I always think that if teams would just win all their games, RPI format really wouldn’t matter.